Cavite Province and Its History – Part III

In 1869, the Spanish Cortes recognized individual freedom of expression, association, and worship, legalized civil marriage, and introduced the jury system. A wealthy liberal, Carlos Maria de la Torre, was sent to the Philippines as the new governor-general. Once installed, de la Torre banned flogging in the military, lifted restrictions on the press, public demonstrations, … More Cavite Province and Its History – Part III

Cavite Province and Its History – Part II

Due to its military importance, Cavite had been attacked by foreigners in their quest to conquer Manila and the Philippines. In 1647, the Dutch made a surprise attack on the city, pounding the port incessantly, but were repulsed. At Sangley Point still stands the ruins of Porta Vaga Church which was destroyed during the attack. … More Cavite Province and Its History – Part II

Cavite Province and Its History – Part I

Cavite province extends south of Manila along Manila Bay and includes Corregidor Island, and bounds the provinces of Rizal, Laguna, and Batangas. The proximity of Manila provides a job and agricultural market, particularly for coastal residents. In 1954, Trece Martires City was created as a planned capital city from portions of Tanza, Indang, Naic, and … More Cavite Province and Its History – Part I