Magellan Introduced Christianity to the Philippines 500 years ago

Islam predated the arrival of Christianity in the Philippines by at least a century and a half. Towards the end of the fourteenth century, Muslim missionaries from Islamic countries of Malaysia and Indonesia brought Islam to the southern Philippines, even reaching Palawan, Mindoro, and Luzon’s east coast, notably Maynila (the present-day Manila). With Islamicized communities … More Magellan Introduced Christianity to the Philippines 500 years ago

Iloilo – The Heart of the Philippines

Iloilo City, the capital of Iloilo province, is on the southeast coast of Panay, the Ilonggos or Hiligaynons’ homeland. Iloilo City is on the Iloilo River’s wide mouth, which juts out into the Guimaras Strait. The offshore Guimaras Island shelters it. Iloilo is one of the country’s loveliest Spanish colonial settlements. Iloilo City is a … More Iloilo – The Heart of the Philippines

January 23, 1899 – Inauguration of the First Philippine Republic in Malolos

Malolos, the provincial capital of Bulacan, was a political center in the 19th century for being the seat of government for Emilio Aguinaldo’s first Philippine Republic and Asia’s first democracy. It is the leading historical site in the province of Bulacan. For four months in 1898-99, Malolos was the capital of the Republic. After the … More January 23, 1899 – Inauguration of the First Philippine Republic in Malolos

Batangas Province During The Spanish Regime

Large centers of population already thrived in Batangas before the Spaniards arrived. Native settlements lined the Pansipit River, a major waterway near Taal Lake. Batangas first came to be known as Bombon. It was named after Taal Lake, which was also originally called Bombon. Some of the earliest settlements in Batangas were established in the … More Batangas Province During The Spanish Regime

Chinese and Japanese Revolts Against the Spaniards in the Philippines during the 17th century

      Many foreign powers threatened the Spanish colony during the early years of settlement, mainly the Portuguese, Dutch, Chinese, and Japanese. The Spaniards successfully resisted Portuguese efforts to drive them from Cebu. Later the Spanish King annexed Portugal to Spain, closing Portuguese ports to the Dutch traders, who then sought new trading centers … More Chinese and Japanese Revolts Against the Spaniards in the Philippines during the 17th century

Lemery, the only town in Batangas named after a Spanish official, and its history

Photo Credit – Wikipedia by HueMan1 Archeological finds at ancient gravesites in Lemery include pre-Hispanic artifacts and that the people of this region, called Bombon, conducted a lively trade with Arab, Chinese and Indian merchants over the centuries. Upon the arrival of conquistadores Juan de Salcedo and Martin Goiti in 1570, the Bombon inhabitants were … More Lemery, the only town in Batangas named after a Spanish official, and its history

February 22-25, 1986, The People Power Revolution

  This weekend marked the 34th anniversary of the People Power Revolution, also known as the EDSA Revolution which was a series of popular demonstrations in the Philippines, mostly in Metro Manila, from Feb. 22-25, 1986. EDSA or Epifanio de los Santos Avenue, is the giant ring road encircling Metro Manila where majority of the … More February 22-25, 1986, The People Power Revolution

Olivier van Noort and other early Spanish-Dutch conflicts in the Philippines

Although Spain ruled the Philippines much of the time until 1898, the Spanish had to fight other powers. Dutch fleets attacked Manila several times between 1600 to 1647. Pursuing their quest for alternative trade routes to Asia, the Dutch reached the Philippines and sought to dominate the commercial sea trade in Southeast Asia. Being at … More Olivier van Noort and other early Spanish-Dutch conflicts in the Philippines

The Sinking of San Diego on Dec. 14, 1600 and the Discovery of its Wreck

The San Diego was formerly known as San Antonio, a trading ship built in Cebu under the supervision of European boat-builders. It was docked at the port of Cavite to undergo reconditioning and repair but at the end of October 1600, Don Antonio de Morga, Vice-Governor General of the Philippines, ordered it converted into a … More The Sinking of San Diego on Dec. 14, 1600 and the Discovery of its Wreck